Just Say No

What is peer pressure? Peers are the people that are in the same social group as you and the same age as you. So, now you can basically infer that peer pressure means when your peers influence you to do and act a way you wouldn’t normally act.

Peer pressure affects many people, but the group of people that it mainly affect is teens and young adults. These groups of people are affected more because they’re in the stage where being liked and wanting to fit in really comes into play. A Teen’s years are the years where they are most vulnerable. Most kids want to be part of the in crowd and socially fit in, so they are easily persuaded to do things they wouldn’t normally do.

Parents tend to hold on and to be more strict when their child are in high school, because when you are in high school you are more exposed to drugs, sex, and alcohol. Kids can be persuaded into doing drugs when they go to parties and kickbacks where drugs and alcohol are present. Teen girls can be pressured by their boyfriends to have sex when they’re in a relationship. Another example of peer pressure is like, for example, if some kids wanted to ditch class and then you feel pressured because they ask you to go and you don’t want to say no because you think they will talk about you or think you scary, and now you’re stuck between choosing the right thing, or going with your friends. What will you do?

Although, peer pressure is usually portrayed in a bad way, there are times when peers can have a positive influence on you. For example, if you don’t do your work, your peers can give a word of advice, or you can see them doing well and you want to do good too.

Whether you know it or not your peers influence you. By just hanging around and talking to them, your mind takes in what they’re saying and doing. When it comes to bad influences, don’t cave in. It may be hard, but you have to be strong. This is a word of advice: be you, no matter what.

Katlin Trapp

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Posted on May 24, 2013, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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